More of the Aurora Borealis in Tennessee

As you may remember from an earlier post, we saw the aurora borealis, or northern lights, from our home in Tennessee on May 10, 2024, as did many other people all across the United States. While that first post featured photos of the more “traditional” aurora borealis look, that look did not last all that long. However, the sky still put on a great show for quite a while. Have a look at these photos! Not to bore(alis) you, but there are several of them!

The aurora borealis, or northern lights, shine over the skies of Southwest Tennessee during their North American visibility on May 10, 2024

While we call them the northern lights, this was actually the view in the western sky. It was interesting to see how the color just stopped toward the left of this photo. That makes sense, because that was to the south, and the lights were coming from the north. And the power lines wanted to be in the photo, too!

The aurora borealis, or northern lights, shine over the skies of Southwest Tennessee during their North American visibility on May 10, 2024

Here is another view of the red in the sky, once again with some power lines in the way. The streaks of light were fascinating to all three of us Burnses as we watched the colors in the sky.

The aurora borealis, or northern lights, shine over the skies of Southwest Tennessee during their North American visibility on May 10, 2024

Turning back to the north, we could still see some of the other colors in the sky as the evening went on, but the were not quite the distinct “dancing lights” colors from earlier in the evening. But you don’t often see green in the sky like that, so it was definitely worth another photo.

The aurora borealis, or northern lights, shine over the skies of Southwest Tennessee during their North American visibility on May 10, 2024

This view was pretty much right over our heads. The red/purple color was amazingly interesting, as were all of the stars that we could see. (Read more about the stars down below, by the way.)

The aurora borealis, or northern lights, shine over the skies of Southwest Tennessee during their North American visibility on May 10, 2024

Our neighbor has a bright light that shines toward our yard, so I decided to use that to our advantage in this photo. The light illuminates some of the trees in our yard, and you can also see shadows of Laura and me to the right of the brightest tree (Jaylin had already gone inside by this point). An airplane was also streaking across the sky right above that brightest tree. I wonder what the lights looked like from up in the air.

The aurora borealis, or northern lights, shine over the skies of Southwest Tennessee during their North American visibility on May 10, 2024

As the lights were starting to dim, the moon was also reaching the horizon as it was setting for the night. I had deliberately kept the moon out of most of my photos of the night, but I decided to include it in this one.

How Many Stars

On nights like this when we are outside looking at the stars, especially when our eyes have had time to adjust to the darkness, I am always amazed at just how many stars we can see. And if you have ever looked through binoculars or a telescope at the night sky, you have seen that there are many, many more stars than what we can see with just our eyes. How many stars are there? Too many to count!

And the amazing thing is that the God who made all of those stars, putting them all in their places and knowing each one of them, also knows me. And you. And each one of us.

Not only does he know each one of us, he loves each one of us. Not just in a blanket “I love all of humanity” kind of way, but a personal love for each one of us.

In that same way, we should love one another. Not just by saying that we love everyone, but by doing something about it. Love is better shown than said, after all.

Little children, let us not love in word or talk but in deed and in truth. - 1 John 3:18

Love One Another

About the Photos

Confession time: Don’t look too closely at these photos, because most of them are slightly out of focus. It is rather difficult to focus on things in the dark, apparently. Sorry about that. Let’s just call it an artistic choice.

Also, as with the previous photos, these suffer a little from the web compression, too. Sorry about that as well.

Photo: Each photo is a single JPG exposure, processed in Raw Therapee and GIMP.
Camera: Sony Alpha A7 II
Lens: Sony FE 28-70mm f/3.5-5.6 OSS lens
Date: May 10, 2024
Location: Williston, Tennessee

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About Burnsland
Burnsland is Steve Burns, with generous help from his lovely wife Laura. Steve is a husband, father, photographer, webmaster, writer, podcaster, artist, Christian. Steve enjoys sharing his photography, art, and stories through Burnsland.com, from the Burnsland World Headquarters in Tennessee.